Fallout from session: Corcoran and Oliva support considering redistricting commission

Mary Ellen Klas | Tampa Bay Times | 11/05/2015

As the special session on congressional redistrict was imploding in August, Sen. Tom Lee, R-Brandon, a former Senate president, declared: "Bring me something that works."

Now, after a second special session imploded Thursday and legislators left town without an agreement on a redistricting map to draw state Senate boundaries, incoming House speaker Richard Corcoran and House Redistricting Chairman Jose Oliva are also on board.

"The system is completely broken and it needs to be fixed and I’m completely open to a commission,’’ Corcoran, R-New Port Richey, told the Herald/Times.

Oliva is skeptical that anyone will be unbiased, said he is also open to the notion.

"I'm for looking into it because I certainly think we need to have maps that aren't disputed into the next census,'' Oliva, R-Miami Lakes, told reporters after the session ended.

"I'm not as optimistic that those people will be so significantly more impartial than these people,'' he said.

Sen. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, who has proposed a bill creating an independent commission to handle the state's redistricting, said he has been approached by several Republicans who are ready to consider taking the job away from legislators.

"The Legislature is incapable of drawing its own maps that don't have political intent,'' he said. "You can't put 40 people together and have them set aside their own personal viewpoints and ambitions to have an unbiased process. It's just simply impossible."

But David King, attorney for the coalition that led the legal challenge, said lawmakers should not blame the Fair Districts amendments, which were approved by 63 percent of the voters in the 2010 election, for their inability to reach an agreement.

"Change is very hard to accept — especially when it requires our elected officials to set aside their own personal interests,’’ he said in a statement. "By blaming the amendments, rather than themselves, they are simply perpetuating their opposition to the will of the people and engaging in the very conduct that Florida voters clearly wanted to eliminate from our state."

Six states have their districts drawn by bipartisan panels or independent commissions, and Ohio has a proposal on its 2015 ballot to create an independent redistricting commission. In Arizona and California, a primary goal of the independent commissions is to create more competitive districts


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